The Next Bull Market Starts Here

By Matthew Milner, on Wednesday, April 4, 2018

For more than a century, the "king makers" of Wall Street have been behind every major bull market.

It’s a simple game:

First a group of elite financiers determines which sector they’ll “bless” next…

Then they pour in their money and corner the market…

And finally — once the rest of us jump in — they cash out and make a killing.

This is infuriating. This game is rigged against ordinary investors.

But there’s a silver lining here:

If you know where the king makers will be investing next — if you can determine what their next move will be — you could make a fortune, too.

And here’s the thing:

We just identified their next move.

The Boom of the 90s

Before we reveal the next sector the king makers have anointed, let me show you an example of how they’ve played this game in the past.

In the 1990s, just after the invention of the World Wide Web, the biggest banks on Wall Street decided that the Internet would become the future of technology — and the source of their next windfall.

So here’s what they did:

First, Wall Street banks quietly funded some of the country’s top venture capital firms…

Then, the venture capitalists invested in Internet start-ups like Amazon and eBay when they were still at the ground floor — in other words, back when it was still possible to secure a stake in them at dirt-cheap prices.

And finally, the banks helped these start-ups go public (or convinced one of their clients to spend billions to acquire them), and then cashed out for a fortune.

It’s a game they can’t lose….

Once these “king makers” settle on a sector, their profits are nearly guaranteed.

Don’t Believe Me? Here’s Proof

You might be skeptical that it’s this easy...

Can Wall Street really guarantee its own profits?

The answer is simple: Yes.

In fact, let me show you a specific example related to the above story about the Internet.

In 1996, J.P. Morgan poured $550 million into a New York-based venture capital fund called Flatiron Partners.

Later that year, Flatiron acquired a stake in a tiny Internet start-up called GeoCities. At the time, GeoCities was valued at just $20 million.

Two years later, Yahoo was convinced to buy GeoCities for $5 billion.

Meaning, early investors like Flatiron — and Flatiron’s behind-the-scenes partner, J.P. Morgan — made roughly 25,000% on their investment in just two years.

That’s like turning $10,000 into $2.5 million.

The Next Bull Market

This is the playbook Wall Street uses, again and again, to rake in guaranteed profits:

After identifying a new market to bet on, the king makers pour money into it, exert their influence to pump up prices — and then cash out for a massive windfall.

Meanwhile, individual investors like you are either forced to fight tooth-and-nail for a table scrap of a gain...

Or, worse, you get into these new markets too late and end up losing your shirt.

But if you’re reading this article today, you have a chance to change all that.

You see, Wall Street’s king makers are about to crown their next big sector...

And this time, you’ll know in advance where they’ll be pouring their money — and this time, you can join them before this new sector explodes.

You see, in tomorrow’s article, Wayne will reveal a startling document we recently discovered.

This document proves, beyond a shadow of a doubt, where Wall Street is about to place its next big bet — and where early investors like you will soon have the chance to make fortunes.

So be sure to check your email inbox tomorrow at 11am.

Happy Investing

Best Regards,
Matthew Milner

Founder
Crowdability.com

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